Ex-JPMorgan Gold Trader Faces 30 Years in Prison for Spoofing

Market News: Ex-JPMorgan Gold Trader faces time in prison after spoofing the market.
Market News: Ex-JPMorgan Gold Trader faces time in prison after spoofing the market.

An Ex-JPMorgan Gold trader was found guilty of fraud in the commodities market.

Christopher Jordan was convicted of wire fraud affecting a financial institution by a federal judge in Chicago, the latest win for U.S prosecutors in their crackdown of on illegal “spoofing” trades and market manipulation.

Jodan was found guilty Friday after a four-day trial in the same courthouse where two of his most senior colleagues on the JPMorgan precious metals desk were convicted in August of spoofing related charges for deceptive buy and sell orders.

Jordan worked at JPMorgan from 2006 to late 2009.

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Department of Justice Comments on JPMorgan Trader

DOJ report on Ex-JPMorgan Trader spoofing the gold market.
DOJ report on Ex-JPMorgan Trader spoofing the gold market.

Between 2008 and 2010, Jordan placed thousands of spoof orders, i.e., orders that he intended to cancel before execution, to drive prices in a direction more favorable to orders he intended to execute on the opposite side of the market. 

Jordan engaged in this deceptive spoofing strategy while trading gold and silver futures contracts on the Commodity Exchange (COMEX), which is a commodities exchange operated by the CME Group.

These deceptive orders were intended to inject false and misleading information about the genuine supply and demand for gold and silver futures contracts into the markets.

He is scheduled to be sentenced at a later date and faces a maximum penalty of 30 years in prison. 

Four other former JPMorgan precious metals traders were previously convicted in related cases.

In August 2022, Gregg Smith and Michael Nowak were convicted after trial in the Northern District of Illinois of wire fraud affecting a financial institution, commodities fraud, attempted price manipulation, and spoofing.

In September 2020, JPMorgan admitted to committing wire fraud in connection with (1) unlawful trading in the markets for precious metals futures contracts and (2) unlawful trading in the markets for U.S. Treasury futures contracts and in the secondary (cash) market for U.S. Treasury notes and bonds.

JPMorgan entered into a three-year deferred prosecution agreement pursuant to which it paid more than $920 million in criminal monetary penalties, criminal disgorgement, and victim compensation, with parallel resolutions by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission and the Securities Exchange Commission announced on the same day.

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Source(s): Bloomberg, Justice.Gov.


1 Comment

  1. FrankNez

    Let’s start a discussion! Are you invested in gold or silver?

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