Tag: Short Selling (Page 2 of 4)

Short Sellers Are Now Paying More to Short AMC Stock

Short AMC Stock
The cost to short AMC stock goes up

AMC’s short borrow fee is rising again and short sellers are now paying more to short AMC stock.

This is the fee short sellers pay to borrow and short the stock.

It fell as low as 0.30% earlier this year but has now risen to 18.60%.

Although the short borrow fee is still relatively low, the progression could lead to more impactful losses.

Last year hedge funds lost billions betting against the world’s largest movie theatre chain.

Overleveraged positions with high short borrow fee rates only multiplied losses.

Rising short borrow fees could incentivize short sellers to completely ditch the play and close their short positions as shorting becomes more expensive.

Let’s break it down together.

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AMC’s short borrow fee increases

AMC Short Borrow Fee

AMC’s short borrow fee rate has steadily been increasing as the markets have tanked.

It comes as no surprise that the fee to short AMC stock would increase during this liquidity crisis.

The SPY officially hit bear market territory two weeks ago, but the market bounced rather quickly, trading just above bear market levels.

AMC continues to be one of the heaviest shorted stocks in the market.

It wiped billions of dollars from hedge funds shorting it last year.

And with a high short interest of 22.52%, AMC has more than enough juice to squeeze shorts from their positions.

But AMC’s short borrow fee rate and short interest percentage aren’t the only metrics increasing.

Pressure is escalating as AMC’s shares on loan reach an all-time high.

Pressure escalates as AMC’s shares on loan skyrocket

AMC shares on loan

AMC’s current shares on loan have reached 185 million.

These shares on loan eventually have to be returned to the lender by buying back the stock in the lit market (NYSE).

The massive buying pressure is going to create a high demand for the stock.

As the demand for the security goes up, so does the cost to buy it (the value of the security).

When AMC surged to $72 per share in June, it had roughly just over 100 million shares on loan and a short interest of 24% before falling to 20%, then 14%.

Today, AMC’s shares on loan have hit 191 million with a high short interest of 22.52%.

AMC’s Short Interest Data Updated Daily Here

Short sellers owe their lenders more now than they did when AMC shot up to $72 last June.

No matter what the catalyst is, AMC is inevitably going to surge again.

Related: Pressure Escalates as AMC's Shares on Loan Skyrocket

Will AMC’s increasing borrow fee rate force shorts to close positions?

AMC short borrow fee rate

AMC’s increasing short borrow fee rate may certainly incentivize short sellers to close their short positions.

The stock is slowly becoming harder to short and the cost to borrow it might prove to not be worth risking significant losses as the market adjusts itself for a reversal.

At some point, it’s going to be time to start betting long.

As you can tell, short sellers have the biggest risk here.

One simple bull rally can eliminate short sellers’ portfolios.

And with the SPY showing significant strength in the $400 level, one can assume the markets have potentially found a bottom.

The SPY momentarily hit official bear market levels last week but has managed to trade just above it.

A significant break upwards could bring the entire markets back up, hurting short sellers.

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Also, join the discussion in the comment section of the blog down below.

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Related: These Two Signs Will Tell You a Short Squeeze is Over

Hedge Fund Melvin Capital Is Shutting Down End of June

Hedge Fund Melvin Capital is Shutting Down End of June
GameStop short seller Melvin Capital is closing its doors this summer

Hedge fund Melvin Capital, notoriously known by the retail community for betting against GameStop is now closing its doors.

2022 marks the second year in a row the short seller underperforms.

Melvin Capital lost a staggering 20.6% the first quarter this year alone.

In 2021, they took a heavier hit with 50% in losses.

Now the hedge fund tells CNBC they will be shutting down by the end of June and starting a new company.

Let’s dive deeper.

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The apes were right

In March, I published a tweet asking the community whether Melvin Capital would be the next hedge fund to default.

We all saw this coming, but 90% of you voted YES.

Forward a month later and now the hedge fund is announcing it is closing this summer.

Earlier in March we saw another notorious hedge fund known for shorting GameStop pull $2 billion from Gabe Plotkin’s Melvin Capital.

That hedge fund was Citadel.

Citadel also lost billions last year shorting so called ‘meme stocks’, so it comes as no surprise as to why they pulled out from Gabe Plotkin’s Melvin Capital.

Ken Griffin’s Citadel also imposed tight restrictions on its clients leading into the new year.

Customers were given an ultimatum to either stay with the firm otherwise coming back would prove to be difficult.

Steve Cohen’s Point72 redeemed $750 million from Melvin Capital around the same time.

Ken Griffin received a $1.2 billion lifeline from partners Sequoia and Paradigm in January of this year.

This was the first time Citadel had ever received private funding.

Don’t bet against the apes

Mainstream media doesn’t give retail investors enough credit for shedding light on market injustices.

The ‘ape’ community has grown since last year as retail investors discover the short interest data that points towards a bigger AMC runup than that of January and May of last year.

In this video I go over patterns that are similar to those from last year’s runup and what we should keep a close eye out on.

The apes were right about naked shorting, dark pools, and the dangers of betting against retail.

Now hedge funds are dealing with the consequences of betting against the people.

Majority of the community continues to buy and hold ‘meme stocks’ such as AMC and GameStop in efforts to create a massive short squeeze.

Retail has said it many times, a short squeeze is inevitable.

While the SEC might be proposing rules that could wash naked short selling, yet avoid them in the future, it would take years to enforce if passed.

Will hedge funds survive?

Hedge funds are currently facing deep scrutiny from both retail investors and regulators.

The DOJ is taking Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, and numerous other hedge funds to court.

Citadel is one of the short sellers currently being investigated by the Department of Justice according to a Bloomberg report.

The SEC and DOJ are looking into the following:

  • Communication between banks and hedge funds
  • Proof of ‘Bear Raids’
  • Spoofing
  • And several other market manipulation tactics

Hedge fund Muddy Waters was already raided by the FBI earlier this year for flooding the market with fake orders to drive stock prices down.

Melvin Capital is only one of many hedge funds that has closed down in the past year due to overleveraged short selling, and bad bets.

What are your thoughts on the Melvin Capital news?

Did you see it coming?

Leave a comment below.

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Stocks and Crypto Are Under Attack by Banks and Hedge Funds

Stocks and Crypto

Stocks and crypto are falling.

SPY stock (S&P 500) has fallen below $400 per share and is now down more than 17% this year to date.

Bitcoin is down more than 37% this year and has fallen below $30,000 again.

Banks and hedge funds have been selling off both the stock and crypto markets as the need for liquidity rises.

Will stocks and crypto go back up again?

Let’s discuss it.

Welcome to Franknez.com – if you haven’t joined the newsletter, be sure to do that below. I’m publishing market news and updates daily.

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Banks and hedge funds tank the markets

Banks and hedge funds have been responsible for essentially every market crash in history.

But nothing has truly been done about the systemic risks caused by these financial institutions.

Today we’re seeing the collapse of both stocks and crypto.

Massive selloffs in the market are providing liquidity to institutions in order to keep their losing short positions open.

On top of these fire sales, the amount of shorting has increased to hedge against losses from last year’s bull run.

Short sellers lost billions of dollars last year when the ‘meme stock’ frenzy took over Wall Street.

Today, hedge funds are liquidating the markets to keep up with increased margin requirements this new year.

But at what cost?

Investors invested in great companies are losing money not because of business fundamentals, but because of the lack of regulation in the financial system.

Crypto developers say crypto crash was coordinated

LUNA and UST developers said this week’s crash was caused by a coordinated attack from hedge funds and big banks.

It comes as no surprise since hedge funds and big banks have been colluding to short specific stocks in the market.

The fed has opened investigations looking into these serious issues.

Goldman Sachs’ dark pools are currently under investigation, Archegos founder Bill Hwang was recently arrested with 11 criminal counts, and the list goes on.

Subpoenas went out to several hedge funds and banks earlier this year – one of the hedge funds under investigation is Citadel, according to Bloomberg sources.

Word is spreading on Twitter and Reddit and BlackRock and Citadel are responsible for the massive selloffs in the crypto market too.

Deeper due diligence is being done on this matter.

Citadel or not, coordinated attacks on securities is something the government should be taking seriously.

Will stocks and crypto bounce back?

It’s difficult to look ahead when the markets are bleeding, after all you are seeing your net worth drop quicker than it took for it to reach new heights.

If you’re worried about today’s markets, you might have been introduced to a short-term way of investing.

While certain plays could be short-term trades, majority of the market tends to be a long-term speculative game.

We bet that the companies we’re investing in will do great over the span of 10 years or so and let the markets go through the ups and downs, at least in the case of the stock market.

Crypto has and will always have greater potential than it has previously seen.

And crypto heads know this.

Is this the end of the stock and crypto markets?

Absolutely not.

What we’re seeing today has happened several times over the course of both markets.

After a climb, there’s always some setback that scares investors momentarily.

But if there’s something we can always learn from historic patterns, it’s that stocks and crypto have always gone right back up and set even bigger all-time highs.

Is now the perfect time to buy?

is now the perfect time to buy stocks and crypto?
Is now the perfect time to buy stocks and crypto?

It seems both stocks and crypto are having a difficult time finding a bottom.

And trying to time it has always proven that no one can time the markets perfectly.

Searching for a good entry point could just as likely end up hurting you if the markets were to suddenly go through a reversal.

Skilled long-term investors know that when the markets are red, you buy and hold.

Because the price of securities always goes up after a dreadful period of nonstop downtrend.

The upcoming reversal will have you wishing you’d have stocked up on stocks and crypto today.

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Related: Are Institutions Preparing to Close Short Positions in AMC?

Tiger Global Hedge Fund Sinks a Massive 34% This Year

Tiger Global Hedge Fund Sings 34%
From left, Chase Coleman III, Scott Shleifer, and John Curtius. Photos by Bloomberg. Art by Mike Sullivan, Edited by Frank Nez

Tiger Global has an AUM of $95 billion, that’s $57 billion more than Citadel’s AUM of approximately $38 billion.

The monster hedge fund is managed by Chase Coleman, 46, who was up until now considered to be a hedge fund legend.

Tiger Global Management had a rough 2021 according to sources and losses are piling up in 2022.

Hedge funds seem to be in a lot of distress recently.

Let’s break it down together.

franknez.com

Welcome to Franknez.com – if you haven’t joined the newsletter, be sure to do that below. I’m publishing market news and updates daily.

Let’s dive right into it!

Join the newsletter to become part of an activist group fighting for market transparency!

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Hedge funds face turbulence in 2022

Tiger Global

This year we’ve seen many hedge funds face massive adversity.

Hedge funds have been dealing with significant losses this year, probes from the DOJ, and scrutiny from retail investors.

Hedge fund managers once deemed leaders in their industry now have their reputation on the line.

Gabe Plotkin was named a great trader by Citadel’s Ken Griffin although the hedge fund had to bail Melvin Capital out due to the ‘meme stock’ frenzy.

Citadel pulled $2 billion from Melvin Capital in recent months.

Chase Coleman is in a sticky situation too.

Tiger Global Management is down 34% this year through March.

The speed of the reversal has shocked just about everyone, considering that Coleman is celebrated as one of his generation’s brightest stars, a standout among the elite money managers mentored by the famed Julian Robertson, Bloomberg.

Tiger Global Management treads rocky waters

The bad run has been fueled by massive bets on stocks that have been hammered, such as fast-growing tech companies in the U.S and China.

Tiger Global hedge fund lost 7% last year, its first annual drop since 2016 and its third total, according to Bloomberg.

Tiger Global told clients in a letter that it’s opening up both its hedge and long funds to a limited amount of capital from existing investors to bolster positions in stocks that underperformed

However, we see the results in the first quarter of 2022 has not been what the hedge fund anticipated.

Built by Coleman and his partner Scott Shleifer, Tiger Global has long been seen as a throwback to the industry’s glory years, when double-digit returns were the norm and ‘hotshot managers’ unerringly backed winning companies and shorted the losers.

Across the firm’s $35 billion in funds focused on public companies, this year’s losses have triggered a more than $10 billion hit to investors that include foundations, endowments and pension funds, as well as Tiger Global insiders.

Coleman’s personal wealth has dropped by $1.3 billion, according to calculations by the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. 

Coleman’s hedge fund headed towards worst year

Tiger Global hedge fund may be on track for one of its worst years yet.

Tiger Global Hedge Fund

The blue in this chart indicates the hedge fund’s losses in 2008, 2016, 2021, and 2022.

The firm’s first serious bump was during the 2008 financial crisis, when it lost 26%, followed by a 1% gain the next year.

While markets were already jittery this year due to high inflation and expectations of rate hikes, Russia’s war against Ukraine triggered a flight from risk. 

The Russia-Ukraine conflict has affected every corner of the financial sector.

Earlier we saw Citadel and other hedge funds faced default on Russian bonds from tech company Yandex.

But Tiger Global Management isn’t the only hedge fund struggling.

Investors are pulling out $250 million from Coatue Management and the hedge fund cannot meet its investors demands.

We’re beginning to see this domino effect of losses begin to catch up to even the biggest hedge funds in the world.

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I’d love to hear your thoughts on the matter.

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